Oklahoma Car Insurance 101 (Compare Costs & Companies)

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Oklahoma Statistics SummaryDetails
Miles of Roadway112,711
Number of Vehicles Registered2,859,419
Population3,904,353
Most Popular VehicleFord F-150
Uninsured %10.5%
State Rank: 31
Total Driving FatalitiesSpeeding: 147
DUI: 294
Average Annual PremiumsLiability: $461.01
Collision: $318.47
Comprehensive: $225.84
Cheapest ProvidersState Farm
USAA

Welcome to the Sooner State. It’s Oklahoma! Where the wind comes sweeping down the plain.

With a population of 3.94 million, Oklahoma is the 28th-most populous state in the U.S. and continues to grow at a slow but steady rate. Whether you are a native Okie or recently moved here, there is a storied history here that dates back all the way back to 1907 when the state was officially adopted into the union.

Oklahoma has come a long way since then, and today we have many points of pride, including The National Cowboy Hall of Fame and our first professional sports franchise in the Oklahoma City Thunder. The Sooner State is also responsible for the invention of the electric guitar and the four-wheel shopping cart.

But if you are reading this article, you are interested in learning about the four wheels connected to your car and how to obtain a quality insurance policy.

Keep reading to learn everything there is to know about cars, auto insurance, and the state laws of Oklahoma. At any time, feel free to take advantage of the Table of Contents located right below to skip around to the section most relevant to you. If you’re in a hurry, punch in your ZIP code above to get instant rates from a number of providers.

Table of Contents

Oklahoma Car Insurance Coverage and Rates

On average, Oklahomans pay $1,568 in car insurance premiums a year. That makes the state the 18th-most expensive in the country and puts us above the national average of $1,311.

There are a number of factors that determine the general insurance rate in Oklahoma, as well as a personal rate. It’s a combination of both that will give you a better understanding of what you might pay since, insurance providers are interested in who you are, where you live, and what your driving record looks like.

The following section will provide an overview of the car culture in Oklahoma, minimum insurance requirements, additional coverage options, and rates by location and demographic.

Keep scrolling to learn more about car insurance coverage and rates in the Sooner State.

What is Oklahoma’s car culture like?

From the bustling streets of downtown Oklahoma City to the quiet town roads along Route 66, the Sooner State offers a beautiful drive to Oklahomans and visitors alike. With so many picturesque streets to choose from, the car culture of Oklahoma is an enthusiastic one, especially when it comes to trucks.

Oklahoma has a lot of agriculture, and that is why pickups are very popular. In fact, The Hartford predicts that you’ll probably see more trucks than sedans if you stay long enough.

The love of vehicles is not only native to Oklahomans. Those passing through are given the ultimate platform to admire the great American road trip in the form of Oklahoma’s Route 66 Museum.

How much coverage is required for Oklahoma minimum coverage?

To take advantage of Oklahoma’s bustling car (or truck) culture, you must carry auto insurance. The law indicates that drivers will need to have liability. This liability insurance must carry, at the bare minimum, the following:

  • $25,000 for injury/death to one person per accident
  • $50,000 for injury/death to more than one person per accident
  • $25,000 for damage to property per accident

If a driver gets pulled over for a traffic stop in Oklahoma and doesn’t have minimum coverage liability insurance, they face a $250 fine, 30 days in jail, and their driver’s license will get suspended along with their vehicle registration.

What are the forms of financial responsibility in Oklahoma?

It’s always a good idea to have forms that prove financial responsibility kept in a safe place within the vehicle. The most common types of forms that drivers carry are a physical or digital copy of the insurance policy.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety, a driver who was cited can file a request for a hearing to prove financial responsibility within 10 days of receiving a notice to avoid any penalties.

In short, don’t get caught without an insurance policy that meets the state’s requirements. If you don’t have it at the time, be ready to prove it in court. The state of Oklahoma has severe penalties for drivers who cannot prove they are financially responsible for their vehicle.

For information, see OK.gov Chapter 15 – Financial Responsibility.

How much percentage of income are premiums in Oklahoma?

Have you ever wondered how much Americans pay for insurance premiums as it relates to their disposable income? The national average is 2.39 percent, and Oklahomans pay a slightly higher ratio, at 2.41 percent. The following table outlines a three-year trend so you can see how this ratio has fluctuated.

YearFull CoverageDisposable IncomeInsurance as % of Income
2014$985.58$40,879.002.41%
2013$931.41$38,623.002.41%
2012$902.90$37,298.002.42%

These figures are, of course, general statistics compiled from the entire state. While that will give you a good idea of what you might pay, we recommend using the calculator tool below. All you have to do is punch in your information to see your rate as a percentage of your income.

What are the core coverages in Oklahoma?

We’ve already gone over the state’s minimum insurance requirements to drive in Oklahoma legally. But if you are like most other people, you might be interested in having core coverage that extends beyond the bare minimum.

The most common types of core coverage policies Oklahomans obtain for themselves are liability, collision, comprehensive, and full.

According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), the following table provides a five-year trend of what people in Oklahoma pay for these core coverage options.

Coverage Type20152014201320122011Average
Liability$461.01$458.72$443.88$428.09$416.16$441.57
Collision$318.47$307.00$290.08$289.80$285.70$298.21
Comprehensive$225.84$219.85$197.45$185.01$179.63$201.56
Combined (Full)$1,005.32$985.58$931.41$902.90$881.50$941.34

One thing to keep in mind is that this data provided by the NAIC is based on the state minimum. Therefore, it is entirely possible that your policy can look a little different based on what you go with.

What additional liability is available in Oklahoma?

Drivers in Oklahoma can expand on their policy by electing to get additional liability insurance. By doing so, you are further protecting yourself from becoming financially responsible for personal injuries, medical payments, and uninsured drivers.

Three of the most popular forms of additional liability insurance include Personal Injury Protection (PIP), MedPay, and Uninsured Motorist Coverage.

  • Personal Injury Protection is a form of no-fault coverage that will cover your own medical expenses in the event of an accident.
  • MedPay is reserved for covering the costs of medical expenses for everyone in your vehicle in the event of an accident.
  • Uninsured Motorist Coverage is a security blanket that will keep you protected should you be involved in an accident with an at-fault driver who does not have any liability coverage. This will also keep you protected if the offending driver’s insurance is too minimal to cover any medical expenses you might need.

So what happens when an accident occurs, and you file a claim with your own insurance provider? Depending upon the nature of the accident, you will be in good shape so long as your provider has a healthy loss ratio.

In the insurance industry, a company’s loss ratio is the difference between how much money they take in from customers as premiums against how much they spend on claims. Generally speaking, a loss ratio between 60 to 70 is considered to be favorable.

When shopping for car insurance with the intention of having additional liability, it’s a good idea to research the provider’s loss ratio before making a decision.

What add-ons, endorsements, and riders are available in Oklahoma?

Outside of additional liability insurance, car owners in Oklahoma are free to explore even more coverage for their policies in the form of add-ons, endorsements, and riders. Some of these extra programs include the following:

  • Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) — This form of insurance is called “GAP” as an acronym for Guaranteed Auto Protection, which bridges any difference in what you might owe following an accident. For example, GAP insurance will cover the difference between what you owe on your car lease or loan and the real-time value of the car after a fender bender or even a major crash.
  • Personal Umbrella Policy (PUP) — For an easy way to add an additional level of protection to your policy, consider a PUP to keep you safe from lawsuits that may result from an accident.
  • Rental Reimbursement — If you need a rental car while your personal vehicle is in the shop for repairs, Rental Reimbursement will cover the cost.
  • Emergency Roadside Assistance — This add-on will help you if your tire blows out, the engine overheats, or any other number of mishaps occur that leave you stranded on the side of the road.
  • Mechanical Breakdown Insurance — Any time a mechanical failure occurs that didn’t result from an accident, Mechanical Breakdown Insurance will cover it.
  • Non-Owner Car Insurance — If you don’t own or lease your own vehicle but still drive on occasion, this add-on will provide you with limited liability coverage.
  • Modified Car Insurance Coverage — There are plenty of cars on the road that have been modified, and if you are the type that likes to customize your ride, this policy will cover the cost of those modifications in the event of an accident.
  • Collector Car Insurance — Vintage cars are special, and that’s why this additional form of insurance is a good idea to consider if you drive a classic car.
  • Pay-As-You-Drive, aka Usage-Based Insurance — A lot of drivers have switched over to usage-based coverage and pay per mile or how often you drive. This is a good option for people who don’t drive as often and are curious about saving money on their policy.

Do any of the preceding add-ons, endorsements, and riders appeal to you? If so, talk to your insurance provider about including them in your policy. The more protection you have, the better off you will be if something goes awry on the roads of Oklahoma.

Does gender and age affect my car insurance in Oklahoma?

You might be curious to learn what a single, teenage male pays for car insurance compared to a married, middle-aged man. Or a single female in her twenties compared to a married woman in her forties.

Whatever the case, gender, age, and marital status play a factor in determining auto insurance rates in Oklahoma.

The following table includes data that has a breakout of the statewide averages. Take a look for yourself to see if you are paying more or less than your fellow Oklahomans.

CompanyMarried 35-year-old FemaleMarried 35-year-old MaleMarried 60-year-old FemaleMarried 60-year-old MaleSingle 17-year-old FemaleSingle 17-year-old MaleSingle 25-year-old FemaleSingle 25-year-old Male
Allstate$2,328.59$2,340.04$2,141.58$2,249.20$7,139.27$8,374.22$2,516.93$2,659.13
Farmers$2,388.47$2,371.89$2,146.04$2,266.74$9,093.76$9,327.58$2,709.31$2,835.43
Geico$2,253.30$2,465.41$2,404.73$2,704.77$6,619.94$7,073.30$1,975.53$2,001.68
SAFECO$4,632.47$4,896.08$4,069.22$4,435.89$12,935.67$14,212.79$4,819.54$4,995.32
Progressive$2,671.48$2,540.84$2,198.84$2,327.53$10,613.86$11,900.02$3,126.90$3,279.31
State Farm$1,920.57$1,920.57$1,690.71$1,690.71$4,875.91$6,153.78$2,017.34$2,264.81
USAA$1,883.69$1,887.12$1,807.32$1,826.96$6,095.05$6,803.79$2,425.69$2,663.55
AVERAGE$2,582.65$2,631.71$2,351.21$2,500.26$8,196.21$9,120.78$2,798.75$2,957.03

As you can see, single, 17-year-old males pay the most on average at a rate of $9,120.78. The demographic that has the most affordable policy on average is the married, 60-year-old female who pays $2,351.21.

Keep in mind that these are all general averages taken from thousands of Oklahoma drivers. The only way to know that you are getting a good deal is by checking rates out for yourself. Reference these figures the next time you are shopping or checking out auto insurance policies.

What are the cheapest rates by ZIP code in Oklahoma?

At the begging of this article, we encourage you to enter your ZIP code to get exposed to different auto insurance policies. The reason we invited you to do so is because where you live plays a role in what you will pay for car insurance.

Premiums in Oklahoma vary from city to city and even between ZIP codes within the same city.

The following two tables will give you an idea of what insurance policies cost for different ZIP codes of the Sooner State. The first table outlines the top 25 most expensive ZIP codes, while the second table features the bottom 25 most affordable ZIP codes.

ZIP CodeAverageAllstateFarmersGeicoProgressiveSAFECOState FarmUSAA
73102$4,879.88$4,500.37$4,533.72$3,653.93$6,611.05$8,056.71$3,427.03$3,376.34
73103$4,872.88$4,500.37$4,776.75$3,725.38$6,412.37$7,986.52$3,332.42$3,376.34
73106$4,893.94$4,500.37$4,937.31$3,725.38$6,024.45$8,278.13$3,243.59$3,548.39
73108$4,873.81$4,500.37$4,653.75$3,725.38$6,090.43$8,278.13$3,320.26$3,548.39
73109$4,867.95$4,500.37$4,552.29$3,653.93$6,211.04$8,234.24$3,379.66$3,544.14
73119$4,901.45$4,500.37$4,449.51$3,725.38$6,328.07$8,234.24$3,524.17$3,548.39
74103$5,031.82$4,400.49$4,717.59$3,869.59$7,174.36$7,967.96$3,491.00$3,601.75
74104$4,906.22$4,339.02$5,040.39$3,869.59$6,026.21$8,124.78$3,475.89$3,467.63
74105$4,869.18$4,554.27$4,997.34$3,869.59$5,745.38$8,129.71$3,378.65$3,409.32
74106$5,113.35$4,610.46$4,765.60$4,549.05$6,415.81$8,036.87$3,612.06$3,803.59
74110$5,150.50$4,610.46$4,768.78$4,549.05$6,463.20$8,036.87$3,821.57$3,803.59
74112$4,905.35$4,339.02$5,084.96$3,869.59$5,767.37$8,033.79$3,443.96$3,798.77
74115$5,130.85$4,339.02$4,957.96$4,549.05$6,486.61$8,170.58$3,613.95$3,798.77
74116$4,912.91$4,028.06$4,666.16$4,549.05$6,252.36$7,777.09$3,399.50$3,718.14
74119$4,938.24$4,319.88$4,972.28$3,869.59$6,332.46$8,138.50$3,333.26$3,601.75
74120$4,955.86$4,610.46$4,757.26$3,869.59$6,436.54$8,133.55$3,416.00$3,467.63
74126$4,924.71$3,915.50$4,891.26$4,549.05$5,752.62$8,036.87$3,524.07$3,803.59
74127$4,870.80$3,825.26$4,976.00$4,549.05$5,994.04$7,900.10$3,249.42$3,601.75
74128$4,946.22$4,028.06$4,958.87$4,549.05$6,046.90$8,033.79$3,286.17$3,720.71
74129$4,932.56$4,610.46$4,932.74$3,869.59$5,904.00$8,064.64$3,425.78$3,720.71
74130$4,887.69$4,255.44$4,653.72$4,549.05$5,897.39$7,561.76$3,492.86$3,803.59
74134$4,923.31$4,610.46$4,966.27$3,869.59$5,740.74$8,064.64$3,493.32$3,718.14
74135$4,883.58$4,610.46$4,699.13$3,869.59$6,101.54$8,129.71$3,348.99$3,425.64
74146$4,996.54$4,610.46$4,973.95$3,869.59$6,253.73$8,064.64$3,482.71$3,720.71
74172$4,895.94$4,400.49$4,531.69$3,869.59$7,267.59$7,967.96$2,739.02$3,495.20

And now for the ZIP codes that are paying the least amount on their auto insurance policies in Oklahoma.

ZIP CodeAverageAllstateFarmersGeicoProgressiveSAFECOState FarmUSAA
73521$3,682.05$3,651.43$3,757.21$2,743.46$4,247.18$6,059.14$2,536.43$2,779.47
73523$3,724.33$3,651.43$3,757.21$2,743.46$4,398.59$6,059.14$2,591.02$2,869.47
73526$3,745.24$3,651.43$3,958.12$2,743.46$4,149.82$6,048.86$2,594.10$3,070.86
73537$3,694.92$3,651.43$3,598.67$2,743.46$4,089.93$6,119.06$2,591.02$3,070.86
73538$3,753.25$3,542.90$3,674.06$2,929.45$3,935.21$6,417.53$2,680.52$3,093.05
73539$3,692.21$3,651.43$3,701.45$2,743.46$4,038.41$6,048.86$2,591.02$3,070.86
73542$3,650.18$3,531.54$3,716.25$2,743.46$4,036.19$6,134.72$2,369.85$3,019.27
73549$3,722.42$3,651.43$3,809.37$2,743.46$4,071.71$6,119.06$2,591.02$3,070.86
73552$3,727.43$3,542.90$3,611.87$2,929.45$3,974.04$6,170.47$2,650.11$3,213.20
73555$3,646.98$3,531.54$3,558.54$2,743.46$4,036.19$6,048.86$2,591.02$3,019.27
73570$3,692.55$3,531.54$3,787.56$2,743.46$4,162.66$6,119.06$2,484.29$3,019.27
73703$3,729.94$3,414.64$3,735.75$3,198.59$4,317.07$6,062.18$2,605.49$2,775.83
73931$3,743.28$3,492.08$3,874.99$3,198.59$3,991.29$5,930.51$2,652.36$3,063.11
73932$3,746.46$3,492.08$3,992.83$3,198.59$3,880.23$5,973.04$2,625.34$3,063.11
73933$3,754.57$3,492.08$3,848.13$3,198.59$3,920.57$5,930.51$2,828.97$3,063.11
73937$3,725.60$3,492.08$3,987.50$3,198.59$3,816.37$5,930.51$2,591.02$3,063.11
73938$3,732.65$3,492.08$3,924.56$3,198.59$3,875.08$5,930.51$2,644.59$3,063.11
73939$3,704.39$3,492.08$3,871.33$3,198.59$3,764.82$5,974.78$2,566.00$3,063.11
73942$3,735.69$3,492.08$3,773.40$3,198.59$3,975.41$6,107.55$2,539.69$3,063.11
73944$3,726.17$3,492.08$3,844.58$3,198.59$3,963.30$5,930.51$2,591.02$3,063.11
73945$3,725.51$3,492.08$3,824.81$3,198.59$3,978.70$6,107.55$2,413.73$3,063.11
73946$3,715.81$3,492.08$3,973.18$3,198.59$3,762.15$5,930.51$2,591.02$3,063.11
73949$3,737.64$3,492.08$3,789.75$3,198.59$4,086.86$5,930.51$2,602.61$3,063.11
73950$3,734.52$3,492.08$4,077.42$3,198.59$3,849.42$5,930.51$2,530.49$3,063.11
73951$3,725.68$3,492.08$3,891.98$3,198.59$4,076.36$5,930.51$2,427.10$3,063.11

Oklahomans who live in the 73555 ZIP code in Manitou are paying the least amount in the state for car insurance. They currently hold extreme bragging rights over the unfortunate souls in the 74110 neighborhood of Tulsa. These folks are paying $5,150.50 on average for their premiums.

Did you see your ZIP code on the list? How does it compare to your neighbors in other ZIP codes?

What are the cheapest rates by city in Oklahoma?

Now for a more general picture. This section will show you what Oklahomans are paying for auto insurance by the city. Take a look at the following table to see where you stack up. Feel free to use the search and filter functions to make finding your city easier.

CityAverage Grand Total
ARCADIA$4,434.77
BARNSDALL$4,353.81
BETHANY$4,603.06
BIXBY$4,539.08
BROKEN ARROW$4,615.49
CATOOSA$4,355.91
CHOCTAW$4,493.07
COWETA$4,377.70
EDMOND$4,376.60
GLENPOOL$4,659.69
HARRAH$4,395.57
JENKS$4,533.23
JONES$4,511.62
KIEFER$4,520.91
LUTHER$4,421.24
MACOMB$4,485.54
MCLOUD$4,476.67
NEWALLA$4,500.55
NEWCASTLE$4,346.83
OKLAHOMA CITY$4,723.14
PIEDMONT$4,437.45
SPENCER$4,547.01
SPERRY$4,535.05
TULSA$4,883.32
WHEATLAND$4,559.24

Once again, this next table will outline the 25 most affordable places to get car insurance in the Sooner State, with Manitou ranking at the top.

CityAverage Grand Total
ALTUS$3,682.05
ALTUS AFB$3,724.33
BALKO$3,743.28
BEAVER$3,746.46
BLAIR$3,745.24
BOISE CITY$3,754.57
ELDORADO$3,694.92
ELGIN$3,753.25
ELMER$3,692.21
FELT$3,725.60
FORGAN$3,732.65
FREDERICK$3,650.18
GOODWELL$3,704.39
GUYMON$3,735.69
HARDESTY$3,726.17
HEADRICK$3,722.42
HOOKER$3,725.51
INDIAHOMA$3,727.43
KENTON$3,715.81
MANITOU$3,646.98
SNYDER$3,765.73
TEXHOMA$3,737.64
TIPTON$3,692.55
TURPIN$3,734.52
TYRONE$3,725.68

One trend that you might have noticed from glancing at this table is that bigger cities generally equal higher insurance rates.

So, if you live in the countryside of Oklahoma, you’re likely paying less than your counterparts in Tulsa and the state capital of Oklahoma City. Keep in mind that this is a general observation, and as we’ve mentioned before, these numbers can vary based on a lot of factors.

Best Oklahoma Car Insurance Companies

Shopping for car insurance can be a subjective process. Different shoppers have conflicting ideas on what makes an auto insurance provider better than others. Some people look at loss ratio, others care more about who has the cheapest rates.

Since everyone has a different opinion, this next section will examine all components of Oklahoma’s auto insurance providers so you can make an educated judgment for yourself.

This section will provide an overview of the state’s best insurance companies and provide insight into each of them with the following information:

  • Financial ratings of the state’s largest providers
  • Highest ratings as determined by A.M. Best
  • Companies with the most complaints
  • Most affordable providers
  • What insurance companies charge based on the length of commute
  • Coverage level rates from low to high
  • Cost of premiums based on individual credit score
  • How much you will pay based on driving record
  • Largest providers in Oklahoma
  • Number of domestic vs foreign providers in the state

After reviewing all of this information, you should have a great handle on what different types of policies are available in the Sooner State. More importantly, you will also have a much better understanding as to who you might want to choose as your provider.

What are the financial ratings of the largest car insurance companies in Oklahoma?

A lot of Americans research online reviews as part of making an informed decision about where to go out to eat or what they choose to buy. Doing this when shopping for auto insurance is no different. That is why many drivers look up the financial rating of the largest providers.

The following table shows the financial ratings of the largest auto insurance providers in Oklahoma. These grades can vary anywhere from D to A++, and if a provider is given an “NR,” that means they were simply not ranked.

CompanyFinancial RatingDirect Premiums WrittenLoss RatioMarket Share
GeicoA++$184,19666.79%6.91%
USAAA++$172,91469.06%6.49%
ProgressiveA+$238,95155.51%8.96%
AllstateA+$186,44848.05%7.00%
State FarmA$677,19257.03%25.41%
FarmersA$303,20751.38%11.38%
Liberty MutualA$174,65457.68%6.55%
CSAAA$103,37850.54%3.88%
ShelterA$92,16761.81%3.46%
Oklahoma Farm BureauB+$105,71255.16%3.97%

This data indicates that Geico and USAA have the best ratings in the Sooner State. Nonetheless, you can’t really go wrong with any of these providers since they all have high scores. Oklahoma Farm Bureau is the only company to not have a grade that starts with an “A.”

Which car insurance companies have the best ratings in Oklahoma?

Another source people turn to in the auto insurance world is J.D. Power.

J.D. Power collects data from independent consumer surveys and puts them in a nice, neat format for the general public to review. The following table shows the auto insurance providers who achieved this highest scores on J.D. Power’s survey for the central region, which includes Oklahoma.

CompanyRatingJDPower.com Power Circle Rating
Shelter8585 Stars
Auto-Owners Insurance8565 Stars
Allstate8444 Stars
Geico8384 Stars
Auto Club8373 Stars
Travelers8323 Stars
State Farm8283 Stars
American Family8233 Stars
Progressive8233 Stars
Farm Bureau Mutual8223 Stars
Safeco8192 Stars
Farmers8172 Stars
Liberty Mutual8112 Stars
Nationwide8072 Stars
*USAA9075 Stars

After looking at this table, you might be wondering why USAA has an asterisk next to its name and was put on the bottom of the list with a high score of 907. This was done because you can only get a policy through USAA by meeting certain eligibility requirements from being in the U.S. military.

Which car insurance companies have the most complaints in Oklahoma?

Drivers believe that one of the signs of a quality auto insurance provider is by looking at what current customers are saying about them. The insurance industry is there to help people through difficult and stressful times, such as a car accident.

Therefore, customers want to know which companies are receiving the most complaints so they can better understand what the customer service level is like for these providers.

This next table will outline the auto insurance providers in Oklahoma who receive the most complaints from its current users.

CompanyComplaint RatioTotal Complaints
Allstate0.5163
CSAA3.976
Farmers00
Geico02
Liberty Mutual5.95222
Oklahoma Farmers Bureau0.212
Progressive0.75120
Shelter0.6147
State Farm0.441,482
USSA02

It’s important to note both the total number of complaints as well as the ratio. For example, State Farm is at the top of the list with over 1200 complaints. However, this is due largely in part because they have so many customers. In actuality, Liberty Mutual has the highest complaint ratio with an index of 5.95.

What are the cheapest car insurance companies in Oklahoma?

Everybody wants a great deal on their auto insurance. Some providers are able to offer an excellent product at a low rate. Other providers might have a low cost, but their customer service is lacking in quality.

Whether pricing is the most important factor to you or not, the following data shows the cheapest car insurance providers available in the state of Oklahoma.

CompanyAverageCompared to State Average (Rate)Compared to State Average (%)
Allstate$3,718.62-$423.70-11.39%
Farmers$4,142.40$0.080.00%
Geico$3,437.33-$704.99-20.51%
Progressive$4,832.35$690.0214.28%
SAFECO$6,874.62$2,732.3039.74%
State Farm$2,816.80-$1,325.52-47.06%
USAA$3,174.15-$968.18-30.50%

Allstate, Geico, State Farm, and USAA all come in under the state average. That means that any one of these providers would make a solid choice if you are looking to spend less than your fellow Okie.

Does my commute affect my car insurance rate in Oklahoma?

A lot of Oklahomans use their car every day as the primary means of transportation to get to work. That is why insurance providers are interested to know how far you travel for your daily commute. They will factor in how far you have to travel to determine how much you will pay for a policy.

Here is a breakout of what companies are charging based on the commute time for native Oklahomans.

Company 10-mile Commute, 6000 Annual Mileage25-mile Commute, 12000 Annual Mileage
Allstate$3,718.62$3,718.62
Farmers$4,142.40$4,142.40
Geico$3,371.88$3,502.79
Liberty Mutual$6,874.62$6,874.62
Progressive$4,832.35$4,832.35
State Farm$2,768.69$2,864.91
USAA$3,135.87$3,212.43

As you can see from the table, there is little to no change between the rates from all of these providers. Only Geico, State Farm, and USAA increase their prices for those who have a longer commute but it’s not very much.

Can coverage level change my car insurance rate with companies in Oklahoma?

How much you pay for car insurance depends on how much coverage you want. If you want to meet the state’s legal minimum requirements, you will pay less for a low coverage policy. If you want the maximum amount of protection policy, you will pay for a high coverage plan.

Every company charges different rates depending on how much coverage you want. The following table will give you an idea of how much these rates fluctuate per provider.

CompanyLow CoverageMedium CoverageHigh Coverage
Allstate$3,493.21$3,703.87$3,958.78
Farmers$3,962.59$4,095.52$4,369.10
Geico$3,198.14$3,442.87$3,670.99
Liberty Mutual$6,520.08$6,849.85$7,253.93
Progressive$4,481.18$4,801.19$5,214.67
State Farm$2,645.97$2,796.58$3,007.85
USAA$3,048.34$3,165.21$3,308.89

As you can see from the data, Oklahomans pay anywhere from $2,645.97 to $7,253.93 for auto insurance on average. Furthermore, certain companies have more dramatic changes in price from tier to tier.

One of the reasons State Farm might be so popular with Oklahomans is that the difference you pay from low-end coverage to the high end is not as drastic as some of the competitors on this list.

How does my credit history affect my car insurance rate with companies in Oklahoma?

When you buy a house or a car, one of the things you might be concerning yourself with is your credit score. What you might not have thought about is that your credit history plays a factor in your insurance rate, too.

The following table represents what providers charge their customers in Oklahoma, ranging from good to poor credit.

CompanyGoodFairPoor
Allstate$3,073.21$3,484.29$4,598.37
Farmers$3,735.69$3,927.60$4,763.91
Geico$2,732.76$3,437.33$4,141.91
Liberty Mutual$4,724.45$6,024.91$9,874.49
Progressive$4,340.94$4,669.23$5,486.87
State Farm$2,020.90$2,510.32$3,919.18
USAA$2,139.63$2,681.79$4,701.02

Did you happen to notice that $5,150.04-difference for Liberty Mutual customers with good credit as opposed to poor credit? This data shows that this provider cares the most about its customers’ credit scores.

On the flip side, Allstate remains the most consistent for customers regardless of their credit score, with a difference of $1,525.16 from good to poor credit.

The main takeaway here is that you should improve your credit score as much as you can before taking on a new car insurance policy. The higher your score, the better your rate will be.

How does my driving record change my rates with car insurance companies in Oklahoma?

If there’s one thing you can be sure that auto insurance providers are interested in, it’s the driving history records of its customer base. Things like parking tickets, speeding violations, and DUIs are all indicators that a driver is going to be more expensive to insure.

In order to offset any costs associated with more expensive drivers, providers will take a look at your driving record and adjust the rate accordingly.

Below is a table that outlines what the biggest providers in Oklahoma charge based on driving records ranging from clean to having a DUI.

CompanyClean RecordOne AccidentOne Speeding TicketOne DUI
Allstate$3,198.39$3,749.51$3,597.46$4,329.11
Farmers$3,497.47$4,490.66$4,199.60$4,381.87
Geico$2,504.07$3,835.75$3,153.48$4,256.03
Liberty Mutual$4,623.23$7,744.42$6,369.71$8,761.12
Progressive$3,763.08$6,992.38$4,419.80$4,154.13
State Farm$2,616.01$3,017.59$2,816.80$2,816.80
USAA$2,341.22$3,362.41$2,880.43$4,112.53

Every provider changes its rate based on the driving record of its customers. Liberty Mutual adjusts their rate more than any of the others if you end up with a DUI. Aside from that, the other providers are mostly consistent across each category.

Which car insurance companies are the largest in Oklahoma?

After reviewing some of the data that has been outlined in this section so far, you might have come to realize that name recognition goes a long way.

Oklahomans want to know that their insurance provider will be there to take care of them in the face of an accident. And one way of knowing that you will be taken care of is by having a big name provider with the capital to back you up.

The following table shows the top ten largest providers in Oklahoma by market share.

CompanyMarket Share
State Farm25.41%
Farmers11.38%
Progressive8.96%
Allstate7.00%
Geico6.91%
Liberty Mutual6.55%
USAA6.49%
Oklahoma Farm Bureau3.97%
CSAA3.88%
Shelter3.46%

State Farm is very popular with Oklahomans as the provider holds over a quarter of the entire state’s market share at 25.21 percent. Farmers is the only other company on the list to hit double digits at 11.38 percent.

How many car insurance companies are available in Oklahoma?

As the world continues to become less reliant on brick-and-mortar locations across a variety of industries, it has opened up a number of possibilities to consumers. This applies to the auto insurance industry, as well, which is why you should know about Oklahoma’s domestic and foreign providers.

Domestic insurers are companies that are based out of Oklahoma, whereas foreign providers operate their business from outside of the state.

In total, Oklahoma has 31 domestic insurers and 873 foreign providers who are licensed to sell insurance within the state. This data comes courtesy of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), who works to regulate the industry with the most up-to-date information.

Oklahoma Laws

There are plenty of laws that apply to the entire country. For example, we all drive on the right side of the road so you won’t have to worry about switching over to the lefthand side on a cross country road trip.

But there are also plenty of state laws that are specific to Oklahoma. For instance, it is illegal to drive a car while reading a comic book in the Sooner State.

While we might see that and laugh, we are left to wonder what made legislators specifically refer to a comic book when passing that state law. As the times have changed, maybe lawmakers should fixate more on things like cellphones since they tend to distract drivers more than comic books nowadays.

In this next section, we will cover everything there is to know about Oklahoma’s state laws and how it applies to auto insurance and the rules of the road.

What are the car insurance laws in Oklahoma?

Similar to other states, Oklahoma has laws in place as a way of regulating the roadways and ensuring that everyone who uses them is accountable. The best way of enforcing this is by making sure that every motorist meets the minimum car insurance requirements to be eligible to drive.

If you’re wondering how these laws are determined and what they entail, keep reading for the most recent updates to the state’s laws.

How State Laws for Insurance are Determined

The Sooner State follows a “Use and File” system under the jurisdiction of the Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner. According to the NAIC, this means that an insurance provider is allowed to use new rates prior to receiving state approval.

In general, the government regulates insurance through the NAIC in order to protect American customers from paying premiums that are too high.

Insurance is still regulated on the state level, and Oklahoma determined that the best system that works for both insurance companies and the drivers they protect is the “Use and File” system.

Windshield Coverage

It’s happened to all of us. You’re driving along the highway at 65 mph, and all of a sudden a pebble from the truck in front of you kicks up and smacks your windshield.

At first, it’s no big deal, just a tiny scratch. But then it spiders out further over the following days, making it unsafe to drive your car. While it was unlucky to have to deal with a cracked windshield, some fellows Oklahomans have had it even worse.

When faced with a damaged windshield, your car insurance provider is allowed to use aftermarket parts, and they are also allowed to choose the vendor. It’s nice to have these options because they tend to be more affordable. Other states have to comply by replacing the windshield with original manufacturing parts, according to carwindshields.info.

High-Risk Insurance

The Sooner State has a program called the Oklahoma Automobile Insurance Plan. It is designed to help every driver gain access to car insurance coverage, even high-risk drivers.

Examples of the types of drivers who can get high-risk insurance from certain providers include those with a poor driving record or anyone who has had a difficult time securing a plan on their own.

If you were to get covered with high-risk insurance through the Oklahoma Automobile Insurance Plan, the minimum coverage limits are as follows:

  • $25,000 per person or $50,000 per accident for bodily injury
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage

Low-Cost Insurance

Drivers who have relatively clean records but don’t wish to pay a lot of money for insurance might be interested in low-cost options.

Only California, Hawaii, and New Jersey have government-funded programs to help low-income drivers find insurance.

Nonetheless, we can still help you find affordable insurance options in Oklahoma. All you have to do is follow this link, Affordable Car Insurance.

Automobile Insurance Fraud in Oklahoma

Insurance fraud occurs when a person (or group of people) knowingly falsifies information on an insurance claim for financial gain.

This impacts several verticles in the insurance industry, and auto insurance is no exception. According to the IIHS, the most common forms of automobile insurance fraud are:

  • Misrepresenting facts on insurance applications
  • Inflating insurance claims
  • Staging accidents
  • Submitting claim forms for injuries or damage that never occurred
  • False reports of stolen vehicles

The state law of Oklahoma explicitly forbids insurance fraud and considers it to be a felony. Offenders can face up to three years in prison and/or a fine that can’t exceed twice the amount of the loss, according to Title 21-Chapter 65-Section 1662.

Statute of Limitations

Simply put, a statute of limitations is the period of time in which a claimant has to file and resolve their claim or file a lawsuit to preserve the statute. Every state sees this period of time differently, so the amount of time that can pass varies from state to state.

Oklahoma law has determined that a claimant has two years to file and resolve their claim or to preserve a statute of limitations.

Two years may seem like a long time, but it will behoove you to act sooner rather than later. Filing a claim can take a lot of time, and then it also must be resolved within those 24 months.

Oklahoma-Specific Laws

At the beginning of this section, we briefly touched on one state-specific law of Oklahoma that makes it illegal to read a comic book while operating a motor vehicle.

As it turns out, there are a number of state laws passed by Oklahoma legislature that outline what is legal vs. illegal in the Sooner State.

For a full list of state-specific laws, you can reference the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety. This website provides plenty of in-depth information on the Sooner State’s laws.

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What are the vehicle licensing laws in Oklahoma?

Vehicle licensing laws are concerned with linking your eligibility to drive with your insurance and vehicle. These vary from state to state, but in this section, we are going to focus on how the following topics are handled in Oklahoma:

  • REAL ID compliance
  • Consequences for driving without insurance
  • Teenage drivers
  • Older driver’s license renewal procedures
  • Residents new to the state of Oklahoma
  • License renewal procedures

After reading through this part of the article, you will learn everything there is to know about Oklahoma’s vehicle licensing laws.

REAL ID

The federal government has started issuing new identification cards across the country as part of the REAL ID Act. Oklahoma has taken part in the change and began issuing the newly compliant IDs, but there is still a crossover period between old IDs and the new ones.

Luckily for us, the Oklahoma DPS has a helpful page that provides answers to commonly asked questions as we transition to IDs that are more secure.

In short, you have until September 18, 2020, to get a driver’s license or state ID that is compliant with the REAL ID Act. Otherwise, your old ID will not allow you to board an airplane or have access to certain federal facilities.

Penalties for Driving Without Insurance

In order to legally operate a motor vehicle in Oklahoma, you must have an auto insurance policy that meets the state’s minimum requirements. If you don’t have any insurance and choose to drive anyway, there are consequences.

First-time offenders face a $250 fine and can face up to 30 days in jail. Other penalties include a license suspension with a $275 reinstatement fee.

Police can also seize the vehicle’s license plates, assign temporary plates with temporary liability insurance, and even impound the vehicle.

The cost of the temporary coverage is added to the administrative fee, and any fines paid for plates to be returned. If the car is impounded, the owner must also pay towing and storage fees.

Teen Driver Laws

High schoolers go through a number of milestones, one being that this is the age where you learn to drive a car.

While the thought of a teenager who just got out of Geometry class being allowed to get behind the wheel may scare some folks, they have a legal right to drive, the same as anyone else.

Oklahoma has instituted teen driver laws that are split up into a learner stage and intermediate stage before they can become an unrestricted motorist.

According to the IIHS, a teen driver must be at least 15 years and six months old to apply for their learner’s permit. Once secured, the teen must drive a total of 50 hours with an instructor or legal guardian; 10 of those hours must be nighttime driving.

Following the learner stage, the teen is allowed to drive unsupervised in the intermediate stage but can have no more than one passenger nor drive between the hours of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Older Driver License Renewal Procedures

Renewing your driver’s license in Oklahoma is very straightforward.

Regardless of age, Oklahomans must renew their driver’s license in person every four years, according to the IIHS.

Some states have different regulations in place depending upon your age and whether or not you can renew away from the Motor Vehicle Division of the DPS. In Oklahoma, however, you are not allowed to renew online or through the mail.

New Residents

If you are new to the Sooner State, the first thing you need to have handy is your proof of current auto insurance. Once you have that, you can visit a local DMV to register your car in Oklahoma. Forms you will need to carry alongside your insurance include:

  • Vehicle title
  • Out-of-state driver’s license or passport
  • Proof of social security number

If you are in doubt about whether or not to bring a certain document, carry it with you just in case.

License Renewal Procedures

A driver may renew a license through an in-person application by providing two forms of identification and paying the required fee. This fee is reduced for drivers age 62 to 64 and waived for drivers over 65, according to the AAA Digest of Motor Laws.

When renewing, it is possible that drivers may be asked to take a written examination based on previous driving record or have any apparent physical defects.

In the event a license is lost or destroyed, drivers can obtain a replacement after paying the associated fee and submitting two forms of identification.

Negligent Operator Treatment System (NOTS)

Similar to many other states, Oklahoma has a system in place to discourage negligent driving. The Sooner State employs a mandatory point system that adds points to the records of careless drivers.

You can accrue points on your record by doing things like speeding, disobeying stop signs, or driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

If a driver’s record reaches a total of 10 or more points within a five-year period, that person’s license will be suspended.

In order to eradicate any previous points that were accrued on your driving record, you must serve the suspension period and pay a statutory fee for reinstatement. For answers to more questions about the driving point system that discourages negligent driving in Oklahoma, you can visit OK.gov.

What are the rules of the road in Oklahoma?

Anybody who drives on the public infrastructure system of Oklahoma is obligated to follow the rules of the road. While you may think that you have a firm understanding of how to drive, the rules of the road vary from place to place.

Keep reading to learn all about Oklahoma’s driving laws.

Fault vs. No-Fault

Oklahoma is considered to be a fault state, meaning that the person who caused an accident is responsible for covering the resulting financial losses.

If you find yourself on the receiving end of a crash that was not your fault, you can explore three legal options:

  • File a claim with your insurance company, assuming that the loss is covered under the policy
  • File a third-party claim directly with the at-fault driver’s insurance carrier
  • File a personal injury lawsuit in civil court against the at-fault driver

To put this into perspective, states that follow a “no-fault” system encourage both drivers to file a claim after an accident. Each provider will then compensate its own policyholders (the first party) for the cost of minor injuries, regardless of who was at fault in the accident.

Seat Belt and Car Seat Laws

State law requires that every person within a moving vehicle must have a seat belt or car seat, depending upon the age of the passenger. If you get caught without your seatbelt by a police officer, the fine is $20.

A child must be in a rear-facing car seat if they are younger than two or until they outgrow the manufacturer’s top height or weight recommendations. If a child is four to seven years old or shorter than four feet nine inches, they are allowed to be in a forward-facing booster seat.

Young passengers can start to wear the normal seatbelt when they reach eight years of age or are taller than four feet nine inches. The penalty for driving with a child who is not properly restrained is $50, according to the IIHS.

Keep Right and Move Over Laws

It is illegal to drive in the left lane if you are traveling under the speed limit in Oklahoma. In fact, you are encouraged to drive on the right side of the road all of the time with the exception of the few following conditions:

  • When overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction
  • When an obstruction exists making it necessary to drive to the left of the center of the highway
  • When happening upon a roadway restricted to one-way traffic

If you come across an emergency vehicle with flashing lights, you are required to vacate the lane closest when it’s safe and possible or slow to a speed that is safe for the current road conditions.

Speed Limits

Oklahoma has one of the more liberal speed limit laws in the United States.

There are certain portions of the state with a speed limit of 80 mph, which is among the highest in the country.

Before you go blaring out at top speed on the Oklahoma Turnpike System, keep in mind that the State Highway Commission may determine that a maximum limit upon any part of the state highway system is subject to change.

The following table outlines the state’s speed limits by type of roadway.

Roadway TypeSpeed Limit
Rural Interstate75; 80 on specified segments
Urban Interstate70
Other Limited Access Roads70
Other Roads70

Ridesharing

Ridesharing has transformed the way Oklahomans get around the state’s bigger cities. Tech companies like Uber and Lyft have made it easy for passengers to find rides and provide a platform for Oklahomans to drive as an opportunity to make money.

Any drivers who wish to work for ridesharing companies must carry specific insurance coverage that is only offered by these providers:

  • Allstate
  • Farmers
  • Geico
  • Mercury
  • State Farm
  • USAA

Automation on the Road

Autonomous vehicles are gaining popularity in certain parts of the country, but not in Sooner State.

Oklahoma passed a bill that restricts city and county governments from legislating autonomous vehicles. That means that lawmakers at the state level are entirely responsible for any type of legislation related to self-driving cars.

If you are curious to learn about the autonomous vehicle laws of other states, consult the IIHS.

What are the safety laws in Oklahoma?

Following all of Oklahoma’s driving laws is the only way to ensure that everybody who uses the state’s roadways can travel with peace of mind.

Oklahoma’s safety laws are put in place to discourage reckless behavior, such as driving under the influence and distracted driving.

Keep reading to learn about the safety laws of the Sooner State and the associated penalties for drivers who don’t follow them.

DUI Laws

If you drive with a blood-alcohol level of .08 or greater and get stopped by a police officer, you can get charged with a Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) offense. This carries a 10-year washout period in Oklahoma, so it can significantly impact your life for an entire decade.

The following table will give you insight into the varying penalties for first-time offenders through third-time offenders.

Category1st Offense2nd Offense3rd Offense
ALS or Revocation1 month up to 6 months6 months minimum1 to 3 years
Imprisonment5 days to 1 year1 to 5 years1 to 10 years
Finesno minimum; up to $1000no minimum; up to $2500no minimum; up to $5000
Ignition Interlock Device Required?if BAC is 0.15+ for 18 monthsyes, 5 yearsyes, 5 years after DL revocation

One of the biggest takeaways from this data is that you do not want to reach a third DUI offense. The penalties for having two on your record is bad enough because you have to drive around with an IID for five years and pay steeper fees. But netting a third DUI results in more headaches that will follow you for years after your driver’s license has been revoked.

Marijuana-Impaired Driving Laws

The Sooner State is one of nine in the country to have a zero-tolerance policy for operating a vehicle while under the influence of marijuana or metabolites, according to responsibility.org.

That means that if you get pulled over by a police officer, and you have any trace of THC in your system, you can be considered to have been impaired.

It’s best to stay away from marijuana entirely if you plan to get behind the wheel of a car in Oklahoma. Otherwise, you might find yourself in some trouble.

Distracted Driving Laws

Distracted driving occurs whenever a driver has taken their attention away from the road. This can include turning toward a passenger in the car to carry on a conversation, looking at yourself in the sun visor or rearview mirror, adjusting the infotainment system, and using a mobile phone.

Oklahoma has a handheld ban for learner’s permit and intermediate license holders. Furthermore, the state carries a texting ban for all drivers, according to the IIHS.

If you are 18 or older and have an unrestricted license, you are allowed to use a handheld device, but there is a strict “no texting” rule that is enforced at the discretion of police officers.

Driving in Oklahoma

If you made it to this section, you’re already well aware of Oklahoma’s car insurance and safety laws. But you might still be curious to know what driving in the Sooner State is really like. That’s what this portion of the article is for.

Keep reading to learn about the details surrounding the dangerous parts of driving in Oklahoma, along with what you can expect from a traffic congestion standpoint.

How many vehicle thefts occur in Oklahoma?

Over the years, domestic and foreign automakers have spent a lot of time researching ways to make their models harder to steal. And while a lot of car-owners have benefitted from buying a new car that is more secure, there are still vehicles that get stolen on a regular basis.

The most popular vehicle among car thieves in Oklahoma is a 1994 Full-Size Chevrolet Pickup Truck Grand Caravan, with a total of 1,143 cases reported.

The complete top 10 list broken down by year, make, and model looks like this:

Year/Make/Model# of Thefts
1994 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size)1,143
2004 Ford Pickup (Full Size)780
2001 Dodge Pickup (Full Size)419
1994 GMC Pickup (Full Size)304
1998 Honda Civic292
1996 Honda Accord269
2005 Chevrolet Impala181
1998 Chevrolet Pickup (Small Size)127
2002 Ford Explorer123
2009 Chevrolet Malibu119

According to the FBI, this is a breakdown of which cities see the most vehicle thefts:

CityPopulation# of Vehicles Stolen
Achille5210
Ada17,455394
Allen9355
Altus19,054313
Alva5,14951
Amber4601
Anadarko6,756183
Antlers2,30622
Apache1,43917
Ardmore25,211767
Arkoma1,91410
Atoka3,05658
Barnsdall1,19712
Bartlesville36,788771
Beaver1,4292
Beggs1,2443
Bethany19,620334
Big Cabin25713
Bixby26,131373
Blackwell6,76570
Blanchard8,64971
Boise City1,0742
Bokoshe4931
Boley1,1830
Bristow4,251147
Broken Arrow108,8231,765
Broken Bow4,100155
Cache2,85728
Caddo1,0706
Calera2,29515
Caney1976
Carnegie1,71110
Carney6648
Cashion8601
Catoosa7,129267
Cement4990
Chandler3,19429
Chattanooga4411
Checotah3,20779
Chelsea1,97220
Cherokee1,5539
Chickasha16,489302
Choctaw12,556132
Chouteau2,08812
Claremore19,147401
Clayton7804
Cleveland3,21720
Clinton9,455105
Coalgate1,8503
Colbert1,2071
Colcord81418
Collinsville6,83672
Comanche1,59522
Cordell2,85225
Covington5470
Coweta9,718206
Crescent1,56414
Cushing7,790209
Cyril1,0530
Davenport8263
Davis2,82262
Del City22,046550
Depew4821
Dewar8650
Dewey3,51354
Dibble8466
Dickson1,2531
Drumright2,87059
Duncan22,909511
Durant17,871667
Earlsboro6445
Edmond92,876970
El Reno19,133236
Elgin3,1645
Elk City12,057198
Elmore City7082
Enid51,2571,242
Erick1,0342
Eufaula2,97179
Fairfax1,3353
Fairview2,67211
Fletcher1,1380
Forest Park1,0824
Fort Gibson4,04534
Frederick3,62175
Geary1,28619
Glenpool13,954143
Goodwell1,3113
Gore93911
Grandfield9557
Granite2,0086
Grove6,868215
Guthrie11,713174
Guymon11,733122
Haileyville7620
Harrah6,21583
Hartshorne1,96615
Haskell1,9602
Healdton2,75717
Heavener3,32820
Hennessey2,21915
Henryetta5,737131
Hinton3,27325
Hobart3,56744
Holdenville5,66343
Hollis1,88619
Hominy3,48522
Hooker1,95910
Howe7891
Hulbert6070
Hydro9593
Idabel6,940265
Jay2,52065
Jenks22,693208
Jennings3596
Jones3,06721
Kellyville1,14711
Kiefer1,96834
Kingfisher4,93186
Kingston1,6345
Konawa1,26710
Krebs1,92850
Lahoma6453
Lamont4022
Langley81925
Langston1,8572
Lawton94,1342,097
Lexington2,16932
Lindsay2,82757
Locust Grove1,40123
Lone Grove5,25232
Luther1,67512
Madill3,93786
Mangum2,84821
Mannford3,15016
Marietta2,78254
Marlow4,52065
Maud1,07719
Maysville1,2334
McAlester18,181620
McCurtain5105
McLoud4,65643
Medicine Park44710
Meeker1,17913
Miami13,470172
Midwest City57,7721,340
Minco1,6494
Moffett1210
Moore62,476821
Mooreland1,2403
Morris1,4645
Mounds1,2006
Mountain View7593
Muldrow3,25044
Muskogee38,1991,058
Mustang21,392162
Nash2020
Newcastle10,011131
Newkirk2,21717
Nichols Hills3,94038
Nicoma Park2,47335
Ninnekah1,0332
Noble6,79967
Norman124,0742,535
North Enid9223
Nowata3,70952
Oilton1,0154
Okemah3,23966
Oklahoma City648,26015,421
Okmulgee12,183384
Olustee5760
Owasso36,869550
Paoli6160
Pauls Valley6,225211
Pawhuska3,46156
Pawnee2,16030
Perkins2,84141
Perry5,00069
Piedmont7,73822
Pocola4,07319
Ponca City24,397701
Pond Creek8544
Porum7070
Poteau8,913384
Prague2,46437
Pryor Creek9,517170
Purcell6,483200
Quinton9874
Ringling9895
Roland3,72060
Rush Springs1,27114
Salina1,38114
Sallisaw8,548279
Sand Springs19,977416
Sapulpa21,062367
Savanna64217
Sawyer3121
Sayre4,64426
Seiling8504
Seminole7,41593
Shady Point9951
Shattuck1,3334
Shawnee31,725926
Skiatook8,018128
Snyder1,3265
South Coffeyville7586
Sparks1741
Spencer4,03126
Sperry1,29227
Spiro2,1849
Sportsmen Acres3120
Stigler2,76054
Stillwater50,159856
Stilwell4,062209
Stratford1,53916
Stringtown4010
Stroud2,79245
Sulphur5,105112
Tahlequah16,905758
Talala2782
Talihina1,0949
Tecumseh6,699133
Texhoma9551
Thackerville4783
The Village9,512170
Thomas1,2350
Tipton7794
Tishomingo3,11915
Tonkawa3,07730
Tryon5050
Tulsa404,86813,054
Tupelo3134
Tushka3012
Tuttle7,14093
Tyrone7693
Union City2,05313
Valley Brook77917
Valliant7376
Velma6024
Verden5270
Verdigris4,48848
Vian1,38314
Vici7023
Vinita5,53296
Wagoner8,931219
Wakita3394
Walters2,46437
Warner1,6141
Warr Acres10,480220
Washington6551
Watonga2,93128
Watts3101
Waukomis1,3499
Waynoka9603
Weatherford12,178164
Webbers Falls5932
Weleetka98110
West Siloam Springs83940
Westville1,56129
Wewoka3,39047
Wilburton2,63337
Wilson1,7213
Wister1,06716
Woodward12,655221
Wright City7334
Wyandotte3304
Wynnewood2,22716
Wynona4400
Yale1,20736
Yukon26,971351

As you can see from the data, more vehicle thefts occur in larger cities, but that doesn’t mean that the rural areas of Oklahoma are entirely exempt from this type of crime. In fact, Okmulgee is generally considered to be a place with a small-town feel, but 384 vehicles were still taken there.

How many road fatalities occur in Oklahoma?

The Oklahoma Highway Safety Office noted that there were a total of 657 traffic deaths in its most recent annual report.

Road fatalities are an unfortunate part of the department’s annual report, and there are a number of factors that contribute to these statistics due to the dangerous nature of driving.

Should you want to avoid being a part of these statistics, it is in your best interest to go through the information outlined in this section of the article. You will learn everything there is to know about the dangers of driving in Oklahoma so you will be adequately prepared to drive with confidence.

Most Fatal Highway in Oklahoma

GeoTab suggests that the most dangerous highway in the Sooner State is U.S. Route 69. This highway runs north-south on the east side of the state, straying far away from Oklahoma’s bigger cities.

While Route 69 does not go through the more densely populated parts of Oklahoma, it still sees an average of 13 fatal accidents each year.

This high number might be due to its popular appeal of Oklahomans traveling to Texas and vice versa. Both Texans and Oklahomans alike enjoy taking this highway as an alternative to a major interstate.

Fatal Crashes by Weather Condition and Light Condition

Visibility and weather play an important part in driving safely. As you can imagine, it’s more difficult to drive when it’s pitch black outside, or there is inclement weather to deal with on Oklahoma’s roads.

Though we are accustomed to tough driving conditions that are brought about by tornado season, Oklahomans still fall victim to fatal car accidents that are brought about by weather and lighting.

The following table shows data regarding fatal crashes by weather and light conditions.

Weather ConditionDaylightDark, but LightedDarkDawn or DuskOther / UnknownTotal
Normal28150195273556
Rain133171135
Snow/Sleet001001
Other7170015
Unknown111014
TOTAL30255221285611

Surprisingly, the most amount of fatal car accidents that occur in Oklahoma happen in normal daylight conditions. This is a testament to the generally mild weather we experience outside of the storm season when most people aren’t on the road anyway.

Fatalities (All Crashes) by County

Oklahoma’s more populated counties tend to see more fatal car accidents, and that is simply because there are a greater number of people there that can contribute to these statistics.

Nonetheless, we’ve outlined the fatalities by county in the following table so you can see which parts of the state see the most accidents.

County2014 Fatalities2015 Fatalities2016 Fatalities2017 Fatalities2018 Fatalities
Bryan County1711201117
Canadian County1412172418
Cleveland County1628142519
Creek County121414823
Grady County1717161418
Muskogee County11145516
Oklahoma County7385889085
Pittsburg County71371016
Rogers County132216917
Top Ten Counties265303300298295
Tulsa County6172677166
All Other Counties404342387359360
All Counties669645687657655

Oklahoma County and Tulsa County consistently rank as the top two on the list. However, there is some fluctuation amongst the rest of the top 10 depending upon the year.

Traffic Fatalities

Before we get into the nitty-gritty details about each type of traffic death that occurs in Oklahoma, we’ve compiled a general overview of traffic fatalities.

The following chart provides a high-level overview of what these unfortunate statistics look like. This data comes directly from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Type# of Fatalities
Passenger Vehicle Occupant Fatalities (All Seat Positions)445
Speeding-Related Fatalities147
Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities145
Motorcyclist Fatalities91
Pedestrian Fatalities60
Bicyclist and other Cyclist Fatalities16
Total Traffic Fatalities655

As you can see from the data, alcohol-impairment and speeding sit right behind general vehicle occupant crashes on the list. These are two of the biggest causes of traffic fatalities in Oklahoma.

Fatalities by Person Type

The data collected from the NHTSA also revealed a breakdown of fatalities by racial makeup. The following table will show you a breakdown of how many fatalities occur on Oklahoma’s roads by person type.

Person Type by Race/Hispanic Origin# of Fatalities
White Non-Hispanic450
American Indian, Non-Hispanic/Unknown92
Hispanic47
Black, Non-Hispanic47
Asian, Non-Hispanic/Unknown8
Pacific Islander, Non-Hispanic/Unknown2
Multiple Races, Non-Hispanic/Unknown4
All Other Non-Hispanic or Race5
Unknown Race and Unknown Hispanic2
Total657

Caucasians are at the top of the list, but that also coincides with the demographics of the state since white/non-Hispanics account for roughly 65.2 percent of all Oklahomans.

Fatalities by Crash Type

Fatality numbers differ depending on what types of vehicles were involved and what caused the accident. For example, if a motorcyclist and a pickup truck meet in a highly congested intersection, it may not be a favorable outcome for the person on the motorcycle.

Here is a breakdown of fatalities by crash type in Oklahoma.

Total Fatalities (All Crashes)655
Involving a Roadway Departure331
Single Vehicle309
Involving an Intersection170
Involving a Rollover167
Involving Speeding147
Involving a Large Truck115

Of all 655 fatalities, most occur while a driver is departing from the roadway, or they involve a single-vehicle.

Five-Year Trend For the Top 10 Counties

Data from the NHTSA also found the following five-year trend for fatalities per 100,000 residents. While examining the figures, keep in mind that the median fatality rate for U.S. counties is 17.

County Name20142015201620172018
Alfalfa County17.2150.8233.8216.9552.14
Beaver County90.5191.8336.8674.6156.4
Blaine County71.1710.2620.8684.1273.8
Cimarron County43.9990.7446.1793.0792.89
Ellis County97.1123.6724.4725.1650.61
Harper County25.6877.98156.3351.8452.67
Johnston County27.0518.252745.0663.93
Major County25.7190.2264.6639.0991.58
Marshall County24.7624.624.6218.2853.55
Noble County26.018.6735.1161.9179.72
Top Ten Counties76.3868.0865.9358.7366.11
All Other Counties15.8815.6916.2515.6415.62
All Counties17.2516.517.516.7116.61

After taking a look at these figures, you might have noticed that some rates are high, even close to 90. However, the most recent rate that factors all of Oklahoma’s counties is 16.61, which is less than the U.S. median fatality rate of 17.

Fatalities Involving Speeding by County

While we sometimes bolt out the door in a rush after losing track of time, it’s never a good idea to try and make up for it by speeding in your car en route to the destination.

Traveling well over the speed limit is very dangerous and sometimes can have fatal consequences. The following table shows how many speeding-related deaths occur in a year in each Oklahoma county.

Oklahoma CountySpeeding Fatalities
Adair1
Alfalfa0
Atoka2
Beaver0
Beckham0
Blaine1
Bryan4
Caddo0
Canadian3
Carter4
Cherokee3
Choctaw1
Cimarron1
Cleveland5
Coal0
Comanche3
Cotton1
Craig0
Creek2
Custer0
Delaware0
Dewey0
Ellis0
Garfield1
Garvin1
Grady4
Grant0
Greer0
Harmon0
Harper0
Haskell2
Hughes1
Jackson0
Jefferson1
Johnston0
Kay1
Kingfisher1
Kiowa0
Latimer0
Le Flore0
Lincoln2
Logan2
Love0
Major1
Marshall1
Mayes5
Mcclain2
Mccurtain5
Mcintosh4
Murray2
Muskogee3
Noble2
Nowata0
Okfuskee1
Oklahoma27
Okmulgee4
Osage2
Ottawa1
Pawnee0
Payne1
Pittsburg3
Pontotoc2
Pottawatomie3
Pushmataha2
Roger Mills0
Rogers1
Seminole0
Sequoyah0
Stephens1
Texas0
Tillman0
Tulsa17
Wagoner8
Washington0
Washita1
Woods1
Woodward0

Some Oklahoma counties saw no speeding-related deaths. This is something that the counties of Wagoner, Tulsa, and Oklahoma can learn from as these three top the list.

Fatalities in Crashes Involving an Alcohol-Impaired Driver by County

Anyone driving with a BAC level of .08 or greater is considered alcohol-impaired. It is illegal to drive a car when you are in this condition since alcohol greatly impacts your motor skills and reaction time.

Nonetheless, drinking and driving still happens in the Sooner State and often leads to tragic results. The following chart has a breakdown of fatalities by county in crashes that involved an alcohol-impaired driver.

Oklahoma CountyAlcohol-Impaired Fatalities
Adair0
Alfalfa1
Atoka1
Beaver0
Beckham1
Blaine2
Bryan3
Caddo3
Canadian7
Carter3
Cherokee1
Choctaw2
Cimarron1
Cleveland1
Coal1
Comanche2
Cotton1
Craig1
Creek2
Custer2
Delaware2
Dewey0
Ellis2
Garfield2
Garvin3
Grady2
Grant0
Greer0
Harmon0
Harper1
Haskell0
Hughes0
Jackson0
Jefferson0
Johnston3
Kay1
Kingfisher1
Kiowa0
Latimer0
Le Flore3
Lincoln4
Logan1
Love0
Major1
Marshall0
Mayes2
Mcclain3
Mccurtain5
Mcintosh2
Murray2
Muskogee3
Noble0
Nowata0
Okfuskee1
Oklahoma22
Okmulgee3
Osage3
Ottawa1
Pawnee1
Payne2
Pittsburg5
Pontotoc1
Pottawatomie2
Pushmataha2
Roger Mills0
Rogers2
Seminole0
Sequoyah0
Stephens0
Texas0
Tillman0
Tulsa16
Wagoner3
Washington1
Washita0
Woods1
Woodward0

As you can see from the data, Oklahoma County and Tulsa County top the list. This is due largely in part because these counties are more densely populated.

Teen Drinking and Driving

Oklahoma arrested a total of 107 teenagers under the age of 18 for drinking and driving. Furthermore, teenage deaths related to drinking and driving follow a fatality rate of 1.3 per 100,000 population in Oklahoma, according to Responsibility.org.

The national average is 1.2 deaths per 100,000, so Oklahoma is fairly close to its neighboring states. Regardless of the number, this is a tragic statistic that many Oklahomans would like to reduce even further.

EMS Response Time

In case you aren’t familiar, EMS is an acronym for “Emergency Medical Service.” When you think about EMS vehicles, ambulances and fire trucks should come to mind.

When tragedy strikes, Oklahoma’s paramedics and medical professionals work around the clock to ensure that they arrive as quickly as possible.

The following table contains data collected from the NHTSA that shows just how quickly these brave responders are able to arrive on the scene.

Setting of CrashTime of Crash to EMS NotificationEMS Notification to EMS ArrivalEMS Arrival at Scene to Hospital ArrivalTime of Crash to Hospital Arrival
Rural8.515.9649.5766.27
Urban2.627.4327.5135.14

One thing you might have noticed is that it takes EMS longer to arrive and transport patients in rural areas. This is due largely in part because these parts of Oklahoma are more remote and isolated.

What is transportation like in Oklahoma?

Right at the beginning of the article, we mentioned that Oklahoma has a population of 3.94 million people. While there are other parts of the country that are more densely populated, this is no small figure, and there are only a certain amount of roads for everyone to share.

This final section will give you a glimpse at what transportation is like in the Sooner State. We will cover car ownership, commute times, commuter transportation, and traffic congestion.

Car Ownership

According to a report compiled by Data USA, the average household in Oklahoma has two cars, which is right on pace with the national average. This factor includes 41.9 percent of all Oklahomans.

Next on the list are the three-car households, which make up 22.6 percent of Oklahomans, followed by one-car households at 19.4 percent. Lastly, only 2.14 percent of Oklahoman households do not own a car at all, which is better than the national average of 4.26 percent.

Commute Time

Ideally, we would be able to commute to work, and wouldn’t have to worry about people cutting you off or making a sudden stop while the hot coffee in your hand jolts out of the thermos and onto your lap as you make a sudden stop.

But the reality is most Oklahomans have to commute to work and it takes them 21.2 minutes to do so on average.

This commute time is a full four and a half minutes quicker than the national average. So maybe we don’t have all that much to complain about after all. Only 1.88 percent of Oklahomans have a “super commute” that eclipses 90 minutes, and this small portion of the population is responsible for bumping up our state average.

Commuter Transportation

If you ever stopped to wonder where everybody on the road is going during rush hour, it’s safe to assume that they are commuting to their place of employment. This is one of the main reasons people choose to buy cars in Oklahoma because it helps them gain a livelihood.

The most common way Oklahomans get to and from work each day is by driving alone at a clip of 82.5 percent.

After driving alone, Oklahomans tend to commute by either carpooling (9.53 percent of the workforce) or working from home (4.14 percent of the workforce).

Traffic Congestion in Oklahoma

Compared to the rest of the country, Oklahoma can be considered to be more of a rural state. But that doesn’t mean that our roadways can get bogged down with traffic, especially in the larger cities.

The following table contains data from INRIX that will give you an idea of how much time drivers spend in traffic and how much it costs them in fuel.

CityHours Lost in CongestionYear Over Year ChangeCost of Congestion (Per Driver)
Oklahoma City511%$716
Tulsa3320%$456

So there you have it. You’ve reached the end of our comprehensive guide as it relates to automobile insurance in the state of Oklahoma. With so much information, what was the greatest takeaway you had from reading this article?

Regardless of how much you learned today, one thing is for certain. And that’s the fact that you will need to have car insurance in order to drive in the Sooner State legally.

Take advantage of our quote tool by entering your ZIP code below. By doing so, you will be able to get instant offers from a variety of insurance providers.

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